Staff Picks: Contemporary Masters

Contemporary Masters: Works on Paper from the Art Museum of South Texas is on view for another week, so stop by to take a closer look at these three artworks—maybe this Sunday while we're offering free admission. Share your favorites with us via social media by tagging your posts with #lsumoa.

John Biggers (American, 1924 – 2001), A Bountiful Catch, 1970, litho pencil on paper, Gift of Genevieve Vaughan Rossi-Landi

John Biggers (American, 1924 – 2001), A Bountiful Catch, 1970, litho pencil on paper, Gift of Genevieve Vaughan Rossi-Landi

I appreciate John Biggers' depiction of scenes familiar from his Southern upbringing. I especially love his sculptural treatment of the figure. Biggers studied under Charles White and Elizabeth Catlett, (whose work will be featured in our upcoming Reflections exhibition). His figures show the influence of Catlett and White, whose own work was influenced by the Mexican artists they worked alongside in the 1930s. Just like White and Catlett, as founder of the art department at Texas Southern University, Biggers inspired a whole generation of artists. His mentorship and influence is apparent in the work of emerging contemporary artists like Delita Martin.  

—Courtney Taylor, curator

Janet Fish (American, b. 1938), Blue Glass, 1976, pastel on paper, Museum Purchase Funded by the Corpus Christi Caller-Times, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Mestina Oil & Gas Company

Janet Fish (American, b. 1938), Blue Glass, 1976, pastel on paper, Museum Purchase Funded by the Corpus Christi Caller-Times, the National Endowment for the Arts, and Mestina Oil & Gas Company

Art where I can find other artists' influence or vice-versa is pretty cool, right? It makes me feel all edumakated. In school I studied a modern painter by the name of Jeanette Pasin Sloan. Her work is amazing. Her technique is impressive, so impressive, and I am not easily impressed. Janet Fish’s Blue Glass, was maybe an influence to Sloan’s work, maybe not. Either way, I’m a fan of Sloan’s reflections, and Fish’s Blue Glass has reminded me of her work.  

—Brian Morfitt, preparator

Jack Levine (American, 1915–2010), Texas Delegates, c. 1945, lithograph, Gift of Mrs. Ann W. Harithas  

Jack Levine (American, 1915–2010), Texas Delegates, c. 1945, lithograph, Gift of Mrs. Ann W. Harithas
 

I love how loose this feels, like a quick sketch when the artist had a free moment. As someone who is not skilled at drawing, it's always fascinating to see how simple lines and shapes can come together to have such a striking, seemingly effortless result. Plus, after taking a lithography class in college, I have an immense respect for the work involved with that process.

—Brandi Simmons, communications coordinator